Building Knowledge Blog

“Green” Leasing: Landlords and Tenants Can Save Some Green

Posted by Joe Weagraff on in Tenant Coordination

Retail leasing is moving beyond just square footage and location to include sustainable design and conservation of resources—including cash. The market for sustainable buildings currently exceeds $30 billion, and experts say it is expected to double in the next five years. This data suggests that there is a significant effort to not only minimize the […]

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Why Bid Documents Should Be Required For All Projects

Why Bid Documents Should Be Required For All Projects

Posted by Joe Weagraff on in Uncategorized

Whether you are replacing a rooftop unit, chiller, tower or fan coils, providing detailed information to the bidding contractors and accurately expressing the scope of work to be done will insure that you obtain apples­ to ­apples competitive bids and will reduce the need for bid contingencies. However, if you simply call up the mechanical […]

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Chemical Water Treatment in Open Tower Systems

Chemical Water Treatment in Open Tower Systems

Posted by Dan Jackson on in Fundamentals

In today’s world of expensive energy, it is more vital than ever for heat exchange equipment to be kept free of insulating deposits that promote high energy consumption. A typical insulating deposit is a formation of calcium, fungi, mold, algae slime or other minerals on a surface, separating or insulating it from the ability to […]

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 Cleaning Plate and Frame Heat Exchangers

Cleaning Plate and Frame Heat Exchangers

Posted by Bob Schneider on in Engineering

Central Plants may utilize plate and frame heat exchangers for “free cooling” or other types of heat transfer. Maintenance of your plate and frame heat exchanger should be part of your scheduled service program. The plate exchanger, shown below, consists of corrugated plates assembled into a frame. The hot fluid flows in one direction in […]

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Double the Boiler Size and Fire the Engineer?

Double the Boiler Size and Fire the Engineer?

Posted by Dan Jackson on in Engineering

That’s an old HVAC engineer joke. Often when we’re asked to evaluate comfort problems, we find this was more than just a joke. A building’s cooling load is the rate of heat rejection required to keep it cool inside. Conversely, the heating load is the amount of added heat needed to keep it warm inside. […]

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